Book Review: Principles of Music by Bryan Baker

One of the first times I saw Bryan Baker play was during a Berklee commencement concert back in 2005. It was my during very first semester in Berklee and I was blown away. Later on, I would take private lessons with him that helped my playing tremendously. His high energy and intense playing was something that I remember being extremely fascinated with. Even now, he’s still one of my favorite musicians! In this book review instalment, I share some thoughts on Bryan’s first book, Principles of Music.

The book is only 34 pages long but packs tremendous wisdom and value. It’s kind of a repeatable college level (or life level) course with homework to challenge your way of thinking. Examining one topic at a time, Bryan gets you into his world where the basics, i.e. the principles of music are what you need to master in order to find your musical voice.

The 7 principles discussed are:

  1. Sound
  2. Phrasing
  3. Melody
  4. Space
  5. Energy
  6. Unity
  7. Personal Voice

You can actually quickly read through the book but to get maximum value from it, spending at least a week to at least few months doing the exercises from each chapter can definitely help you level up.

Think in-between Mick Goodrick’s The Advancing Guitarist and Wayne Krantz’s The Improviser’s OS and you have basically where Bryan’s book is at philosophically speaking. That’s the vibe that I get from it.

Pros: Extremely good book for all levels of musicians, not just guitarists.
Cons: 
None.
TLDR: If you want to get new ideas to work on developing your own musical identity while getting your fundamentals stronger, get this book. Not for complete beginners. If you expect hand holding, this is not the book for you.

I bought this book when it was first released back as an e-book only release in 2010. Since then, I’ve gotten a physical copy (paperback) which is pretty neat.

How to Buy:
Get your copy of the book (e-book, physical and audio book versions available) here: https://www.bryanbakermusic.com/pages/principles-of-music

[Read more Book Reviews]

Book Review: The Tao of Badass Guitar by Ben Higgins

Book Review: Bach Scales by Jon De Lucia

Book Review: Extended Scale Playing for Guitar by Joe Puma

Book Review: Between the Voicings by Hristo Vitchev

Book Review: Voicing Modes – A Chord Voicing Approach to Hearing and Practicing Modes by Noel Johnston

Book Review: The Outside Sounds and Substitutions of Modern Saxophonists for Jazz Guitar by Kevin Miller

[Submissions for Review Consideration]

  • Are you an author who wrote a jazz, guitar or music book?
  • Have you created a DVD or an online video course or subscription based website?
  • Would you like me to review your book/course?

Please send me a message at azsamad2 at gmail.com with:

For courses: a link to the course/video/product + access info etc.
For books: a link to the book (Dropbox) or PDF attachment (if it’s small) for review consideration.

Depending on whether I dig the book/course, I’ll let you know if I do plan to review it!

I cannot guarantee a review for every submission & if I’m not too into it, I may opt not to review it. I mean, it’s better to get a good review that for me to write a bad review just because it’s not a match for the kind of stuff I dig right? :p

NOTE: All reviews reflect my honest personal opinion so be aware that I will point out both cool Pros and Cons that I see in the work. You dig? 🙂

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Basic Harmony & Reharmonization Lesson for Guitarists

Here’s a lesson to help you develop your understanding of harmony & reharmonization. Thanks Johary Anuar for the question that led to this video lesson!

Download your free PDF here: Harmony and Reharmonization Basics PDF Handout

If you enjoyed this lesson, do check out my lesson packs to help develop your playing:
http://www.azsamad.com/lessonpacks

You can also tip me (any amount) via my PayPal.me page so that I can continue to create lessons just like this to benefit you and other musicians from all around the world.
https://www.paypal.me/azsamadmusic

Thank you! 🙂

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Book Review: The Tao of Badass Guitar by Ben Higgins

I first found out about Ben Higgins via his articles on Guitar World Online. As I read his articles and watched his videos on YouTube, I became convinced that this guy really knew his stuff. After getting one of his Badass Guitar Courses, I was totally a fan. It would lead me to get A LOT of his videos and eventually this book.

In The Tao of Badass Guitar, you get very direct, very honest and real advice. Ben basically talks to you like how a close buddy would while hanging out. He doesn’t mince his words so there’s a lot of profanities interspersed within the advice he dispenses. If you’re uncomfortable with swearing, this book may not be a good choice for you because of the language used.

However, if the language doesn’t bother you – the pure content will fire you up! In 8 concise chapters, Ben summarises important tips that will help you develop your playing. This is not a style dependent book – all the tips address fundamental issues in terms of mindset, practice and playing approach. You could play rock, blues, jazz, fingerstyle guitar – a player from any musical background can benefit from this book.

Ben says it as it is and is a really passionate educator. If you want to learn practical concepts in a very concise and direct way, get this book. And then, get as many of his video courses. Great stuff. Strongly recommended!

Pros: Very short book with precise tips that you can apply immediately.
Cons: 
Very short book – I wish there was more but this book is pretty much in the same aesthetic as Ben’s other works – he doesn’t do long-winded content.
TLDR: If you liked Zen Guitar but want something a bit more edgy, get this book, read it in one sitting and revisit it every few weeks or months.

I bought this copy from Amazon. Love Ben’s work, you should too.

How to Buy:
Please buy this book from Amazon here. It’s only USD$2.99!

[Read more Book Reviews]

Book Review: Bach Scales by Jon De Lucia

Book Review: Extended Scale Playing for Guitar by Joe Puma

Book Review: Between the Voicings by Hristo Vitchev

Book Review: Voicing Modes – A Chord Voicing Approach to Hearing and Practicing Modes by Noel Johnston

Book Review: The Outside Sounds and Substitutions of Modern Saxophonists for Jazz Guitar by Kevin Miller

[Submissions for Review Consideration]

  • Are you an author who wrote a jazz, guitar or music book?
  • Have you created a DVD or an online video course or subscription based website?
  • Would you like me to review your book/course?

Please send me a message at azsamad2 at gmail.com with:

For courses: a link to the course/video/product + access info etc.
For books: a link to the book (Dropbox) or PDF attachment (if it’s small) for review consideration.

Depending on whether I dig the book/course, I’ll let you know if I do plan to review it!

I cannot guarantee a review for every submission & if I’m not too into it, I may opt not to review it. I mean, it’s better to get a good review that for me to write a bad review just because it’s not a match for the kind of stuff I dig right? :p

NOTE: All reviews reflect my honest personal opinion so be aware that I will point out both cool Pros and Cons that I see in the work. You dig? 🙂

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Book Review: Bach Scales by Jon De Lucia

I recently discovered this extremely cool book from New York City-based saxophonist and composer Jon De Lucia. Bach Shapes is written in the tradition of jazz saxophones books with motives moved to different keys, written down, followed by etudes. Like the Technique of the Saxophone series by Berklee College of Music’s Joseph Viola, Bach Shapes has a similar vibe but with a modern twist.

Interestingly, to me – the modern twist involves going back to the music of J.S. Bach and deriving beautiful melodic shapes for the modern musician to use. Although written for saxophonists specifically, I found this book to be immensely useful for myself as a guitarist.

This book reminds me of Steve Rochinski’s The Motivic Basis for Jazz Guitar book and Steve Neff’s Approach Note Velocity series books as well. They are guiding us through the material – in rough terrain so we can reach the beautiful oasis of melodic expression sooner than we would alone. Another book that comes to mine is Mark McKnight’s The Creative Method – though Mark’s book is more about having a specific approach to practicing any material. Definitely all these books I’ve mentioned are compatible as I can see them sharing similar aesthetics.

[My Experience Working With The Book]
I worked through the first few shapes & it was inspiring to see how it made me pay attention to the details in the line, the fingering and my tone. Jon goes into some practice suggestions to maximise the benefits of the Bach Shapes. There are definite parallels to guitar playing worth deriving from Jon’s saxophone approach tips. What I would definitely recommend is for guitar players to notate various fingering options for each shape. I already found some new fingering options that work better for some shapes. Attempting them both pickstyle and fingerstyle, it was fascinating to see how it felt to experience these melodies with different right hand techniques. It would be interesting to see a version of this book with guitar fingerings notated or tabbed. However, I do feel that it would be great for the experienced guitarist to explore this aspect on their own as part of the process.

There are some cool blog posts from Jon on the influence of Bach in Paul Desmond’s playing:
Bach and the Intervallic Sequences of Paul Desmond Part 1
Bach and the Intervallic Sequences of Paul Desmond Part 2
Bach and the Intervallic Sequences of Paul Desmond Part 3

Here are some videos with Jon performing the etudes from the book:

Pros: A very well organised resource for musicians of any instrument to explore Bach’s melodic shapes for technique, tone, compositional and improvisational development. 
Cons:
Since the book is written for saxophonists, guitarists will need to decide on suitable fingerings. Therefore, if you’re not very familiar with the fretboard, this may require additional study before or alongside this material.
TLDR: If you’re looking to develop your melodic language and want to look for strong melodic material to work on, this is a great book to get!

I received a review copy of this book from author Jon De Lucia. Thank you Jon!

How to Buy:
Please buy this book directly from the author here. Please do say hi to Jon & let him know if you found out of the book from this post. 🙂
http://bachshapes.com/

 

[Read more Book Reviews]

Book Review: Extended Scale Playing for Guitar by Joe Puma

Book Review: Between the Voicings by Hristo Vitchev

Book Review: Voicing Modes – A Chord Voicing Approach to Hearing and Practicing Modes by Noel Johnston

Book Review: The Outside Sounds and Substitutions of Modern Saxophonists for Jazz Guitar by Kevin Miller

[Submissions for Review Consideration]

  • Are you an author who wrote a jazz or music book?
  • Have you created a DVD or an online video course or subscription based website?
  • Would you like me to review your book/course?

Please send me a message at azsamad2 at gmail.com with:

For courses: a link to the course/video/product + access info etc.
For books: a link to the book (Dropbox) or PDF attachment (if it’s small) for review consideration.

Depending on whether I dig the book/course, I’ll let you know if I do plan to review it!

I cannot guarantee a review for every submission & if I’m not too into it, I may opt not to review it. I mean, it’s better to get a good review that for me to write a bad review just because it’s not a match for the kind of stuff I dig right? :p

NOTE: All reviews reflect my honest personal opinion so be aware that I will point out both cool Pros and Cons that I see in the work. You dig? 🙂

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Book Review: Extended Scale Playing for Guitar by Joe Puma

This 48-page book by Joe Puma is from a Guitar Techniques series by Hal Leonard. First published in 1993, the copy I have is the second printing from March 1995. Joe Puma builds the foundation of the entire book on the premise that you can extend the length of scale fingerings via first finger half step shifts. It’s a simple idea and is elegant because of that!

I would recommend this book for guitarists who are already comfortable with perhaps a CAGED system approach or 3-note per string approach and would like to connect their scales smoother. My initial impression when I first saw this book was that it’s pretty cool but I already was doing some of this intuitively. The question was: Do I still buy this book? I did and it’s because as a reference it quickly allows me to find a practice routine or new scale fingering to explore.

For guitarists new to this, I believe working through a page for 1 to 3 days could be a good practice routine. Joe Puma doesn’t just list the fingerings but also gives some exercises as well as variations on the scale fingerings starting on different scale degrees.

For more experienced guitarists and music educators, I think this book is a worthy addition to your reference library.

Pros: Good amount of material and systematic approach to extended scale fingerings.
Cons: 
Might require an understanding of standard scale systems to really benefit from the book.
TLDR: If you like geeky scale practice concepts and want to expand your fretboard  visualisation skills, get this book. If you don’t have any scale fingering books or don’t have a strong foundation for scales, my main recommendations would be either Martin Miller’s Improvisation Masterclass Vol. 1  (a very in-depth work with video, PDF files and both CAGED and 3-note per-string approaches to scale & fretboard visualisation) or Six Essential Fingerings for the Jazz Guitarist by Jimmy Bruno (a simpler approach).

How to Buy:
I bought this book from Swee Lee Music (free shipping to Singapore and Malaysia). It currently appears to be not available there anymore. Amazon has copies in stock: https://www.amazon.com/EXTENDED-SCALE-PLAYING-GUITAR-Puma/dp/0793516862

[Read more Book Reviews]

Book Review: Between the Voicings by Hristo Vitchev

Book Review: Voicing Modes – A Chord Voicing Approach to Hearing and Practicing Modes by Noel Johnston

Book Review: The Outside Sounds and Substitutions of Modern Saxophonists for Jazz Guitar by Kevin Miller

[Submissions for Review Consideration]

  • Are you an author who wrote a jazz or music book?
  • Have you created a DVD or an online video course or subscription based website?
  • Would you like me to review your book/course?

Please send me a message at azsamad2 at gmail.com with:

For courses: a link to the course/video/product + access info etc.
For books: a link to the book (Dropbox) or PDF attachment (if it’s small) for review consideration.

Depending on whether I dig the book/course, I’ll let you know if I do plan to review it!

I cannot guarantee a review for every submission & if I’m not too into it, I may opt not to review it. I mean, it’s better to get a good review that for me to write a bad review just because it’s not a match for the kind of stuff I dig right? :p

NOTE: All reviews reflect my honest personal opinion so be aware that I will point out both cool Pros and Cons that I see in the work. You dig? 🙂

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Book Review: Between the Voicings by Hristo Vitchev

 

I first met Hristo Vitchev while I was living in the San Francisco Bay Area. We both had studied at San Jose State University at different times and had studied with Rick Vandivier. I even had the great pleasure of sharing the stage with Hristo once! We’ve kept in touch over time and earlier this after an e-mail conversation inquiring about his book, Hristo very kindly sent me a copy of it!

This 256-page book is a massive work filled with a lot of cool ideas and voicings. Hristo has really embraced a guitaristic way of approaching voicings. Dividing the chord shapes into left expansion, central expansion and right expansion – this fingering-centric approach actually naturally opens up different intervallic possibilities for the guitar shapes. Then, he divides the chapters into major, minor and two dominant chord chapters over 3 string sets. Interestingly enough, this is quite an elegant approach to go beyond the arranging based (drop-2, drop-3, drop-2&4) voicings approach that most guitarists may be more familiar with.

In this book, I find that it’s more about intervals, colors and the physical possibility of executing the sound. Knowing Hristo though, a lot of the voicings present wide stretches in order to access interesting intervals. This is definitely a book that is worth checking out after you get your fundamentals down. This isn’t really a book for beginners though you might still benefit by buying a copy now for your personal library. As your skills develop, this book will be a valuable reference to open up your creative outlook on harmony for the guitar.

For a sample of Hristo’s way of thinking harmonically, check out this free 3-part lesson series from his YouTube channel. Also, you can also purchase a video lesson of him teaching the concepts from the book here: http://www.jazzguitarsociety.com/masterclasses/hristo-vitchev-harmonic-expansion/

If you’re curious about Hristo’s playing, please check out my previous blog post compiling his warm up routines: Hristo Vitchev 21 Daily Warm Ups For Jazz Guitar

Pros: A lot of material to work on. Good diagrams, a systematic approach once you understand the main concept.
Cons:
The material may be overwhelming (it was for me at the very beginning). Also, the left hand stretches are challenging!
TLDR:
 For anyone looking for a very guitaristic, visual way of building new voicings, Hristo’s book may provide a lot of new food for thought. It will require a lot of work (the voicings are physically demanding with the stretches at times) but if you want new sounds, this may be a way to expand your harmonic vocabulary.

This book was a gift from Hristo to me. Thanks Hristo!

How to Buy:
Get this book here from Hristo & please tell him you found out about the book here, if you did! 🙂 http://hristovitchev.com/en/publications/

[Read more Book Reviews]

Book Review: Voicing Modes – A Chord Voicing Approach to Hearing and Practicing Modes by Noel Johnston

Book Review: The Outside Sounds and Substitutions of Modern Saxophonists for Jazz Guitar by Kevin Miller

[Submissions for Review Consideration]

  • Are you an author who wrote a jazz or music book?
  • Have you created a DVD or an online video course or subscription based website?
  • Would you like me to review your book/course?

Please send me a message at azsamad2 at gmail.com with:

For courses: a link to the course/video/product + access info etc.
For books: a link to the book (Dropbox) or PDF attachment (if it’s small) for review consideration.

Depending on whether I dig the book/course, I’ll let you know if I do plan to review it!

I cannot guarantee a review for every submission & if I’m not too into it, I may opt not to review it. I mean, it’s better to get a good review that for me to write a bad review just because it’s not a match for the kind of stuff I dig right? :p

NOTE: All reviews reflect my honest personal opinion so be aware that I will point out both cool Pros and Cons that I see in the work. You dig? 🙂

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Beginner Bossa Nova Rhythm Guitar Lesson

Here’s a quick lesson on:
1) what voicings I use to play a basic II-V-I in C Major
2) a basic bossa nova right hand fingerstyle pattern

Watch the video and learn the rhythm by ear. This is a really important pattern to learn! 🙂

 

Download your free PDF here: Beginner Bossa Nova Rhythm Guitar Voicings – Az Samad

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Book Review: Voicing Modes – A Chord Voicing Approach to Hearing and Practicing Modes by Noel Johnston

I love books on harmony. To me, harmony is all about learning colours and expressing an emotion or mood from the sound. Studying with Mick Goodrick, Jon Damian, Steve Rochinski, Bret Willmott, Tim Miller and John Stowell were real highlights to my musical development because they all taught me different ways of expanding my harmonic knowledge. Discovering Noel Johnston’s book is another highlight of recent times.

This 157-page book contain a multitude of modal voicings, concepts, fingerings, scales and etudes that can help the inquisitive guitarist to go beyond their staple stacked 4th voicings or inversions from the 60s modal jazz era. When I listen to what Noel has compiled here, I hear evocative sounds that I’ve heard from composers like Maria Schneider & guitarists like Ben Monder, John Aebercrombie, Mick Goodrick and Bill Frisell. It may not very well be the exact same voicings that these people use but it certainly in the same ballpark.

Instead of a typical modal voicing book that goes into Dorian sounds, Noel decided to begin with an exploration of Phrygian voicings that are usable in different Phrygian mode variants like G Phrygian, G Phrygian Dominant, G Phrygian natural 6, G Double Harmonic Major and G Mixolydian b2. After sharing some voicings and arpeggio fingerings, he includes two etudes demonstrating the musical context of these sounds.

Then, he goes into Aeolian modal voicings and what he calls the “Magic 6th” voicing , following the same format. Etudes on Stella by Starlight, All The Things You Are, Giant Steps and Blue Bossa help internalise the use of these modal voicings as substitutions within a standard tune context.

Following that, Noel includes a Reference section with:
a) melodic voicings (standard use voicings harmonizing top notes that spell out the respective modes within a functional context)
b) The 7 Major modes, 7 Harmonic Minor modes and 7 Melodic Minor modes
c) other scales and ideas

At this point of the book, it becomes a more Mick Goodrick type resource where he leaves the reader to explore the sounds that you’re interested in.

My experience using the book:
For me, the most important thing is to really dig into the first half of the book to understand the concept he introduces. The voicings, arpeggios and etudes are really important to be played. I find that when I finally started to have an intuitive feel for the material, more ideas started to open up. Then, I could see the possibilities for future usage of the book for my own music, composition, improvisation and reharmonization.

Here’s a great video from Noel introducing the basic concept covered in the book:

Pros: A lot of content, a lot of ideas and examples. Did I mention a lot of content? 🙂
Cons: Some the explanations may require many repeated readings to make sense. This is pretty complex stuff. There are typos in some of the tablature and diagrams (sometimes the numbers in the guitar neck diagrams appear to refer to the fingering and sometimes it’s for the function of the note). The typos I spotted were when it appeared to fix fingering and function in a single diagram. Not sure whether this was just in my edition of the book & whether this has been fixed in the new 2.0 edition.
TLDR: Are you a harmony geek? Do you already know you standard shell voicings, drop-2, drop-3 and 3 + 4-part quartal voicings? Wanna more color in your life? Get this book. If what I just wrote doesn’t make sense to you yet, get The Chord Factory by Jon Damian (Berklee Press) or Creative Comping by Daniel Davis (KJOS Music Company) first. Those will help get you up to speed.

How to Buy:
To buy & check out samples of Voicing Modes – A Chord Voicing Approach to Hearing and Practicing Modes, go to the official page here: http://www.noeljohnston.com/voicingmodes.php

Note: I bought this book. This was not a complimentary copy. It was totally worth the 10 bucks.

[Read more Book Reviews]

Book Review: Between the Voicings by Hristo Vitchev

Book Review: The Outside Sounds and Substitutions of Modern Saxophonists for Jazz Guitar by Kevin Miller

[Submissions for Review Consideration]

  • Are you an author who wrote a jazz or music book?
  • Have you created a DVD or an online video course or subscription based website?
  • Would you like me to review your book/course?

Please send me a message at azsamad2 at gmail.com with:

For courses: a link to the course/video/product + access info etc.
For books: a link to the book (Dropbox) or PDF attachment (if it’s small) for review consideration.

Depending on whether I dig the book/course, I’ll let you know if I do plan to review it!

I cannot guarantee a review for every submission & if I’m not too into it, I may opt not to review it. I mean, it’s better to get a good review that for me to write a bad review just because it’s not a match for the kind of stuff I dig right? :p

NOTE: All reviews reflect my honest personal opinion so be aware that I will point out both cool Pros and Cons that I see in the work. You dig? 🙂

Join my newsletter to get more guitar playing tips & lessons!

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Book Review: The Outside Sounds and Substitutions of Modern Saxophonists for Jazz Guitar by Kevin Miller

I recently discovered this book from Kevin Miller via different jazz & guitar Facebook groups. It had a very specific and intriguing title that made it very attractive to the specific niche audience that is interested in playing outside within a jazz context. (Boy, wasn’t that a long sentence?)

Anyhow, if you’re reading this – you’re probably curious whether this book has cool stuff in it and whether it’s worth the 10 bucks. My take on this – if you’re into modern jazz sounds and have been playing jazz guitar for awhile but wanna get out from straight ahead swing or bop sounds, then this is a good book for you. If you’re very new into jazz and can’t really hear standard jazz changes (not able to somewhat manage improvise single note lines coherently i.e. play inside) – then this book may be something hard to digest.

This is kind of a very practical version of David Liebman’s A Chromatic Approach to Jazz Harmony and Melody. Liebman’s text is more outside and explores a lot more sounds. Kevin Miller’s book is very player centric. This comes from someone who digs these sounds, plays these and has studied them. I’ve found certain jazz books to be heavy on theory side and contains very generic, almost public domain type phrases. This book is not that. Nope!

This is the kind of book that would be good to read a bit, play some of the examples, maybe loop or play the lines over a backing track and digest the sounds. From more common substitutions like playing a melodic minor scale instead of a dorian scale over the II chord in a II-V to adding a V chord to create dominant-tonic resolution over static modal harmony – Miller gives enough stuff to play with.

As I go through the book, I am reminded of the lessons I had in Berklee with Ed Tomassi and later with John Stowell after I graduated. Both of these guys taught me a lot about using more outside sounds in a simple practical way. Miller’s book has a lot of the kinds of sounds I dig. So many subs that I could hear & many more than I haven’t used in my playing. The cool thing is that each concept comes with a number of good examples written in both standard notation and tab.

Practice Tip:
In my personal experience working with this book so far, I would recommend going through the book once to scan through the concepts. Then, pick a few sounds, try out the lines (notated with the tab/articulation) and then start writing and improvising your own lines. I find that doing this is great way to internalise the sounds. Alongside listening to the great players mentioned in the text, this book can be a good practice resource for those interested beyond standard bebop and inside playing types of sound.

Pros: Good subs, lots of examples, very easy to use!
Cons: Layout is not as tight as I would have liked it in the PDF version. There’s a lot of space (Miles influence? Haha!)
TLDR: If you’re a jazzer and dig modern sounds but aren’t sure how some of it works, get this book. If you’re a beginner, maybe get something more inside first. My personal recommendation would be getting a Sid Jacobs book, perhaps Complete Book of Jazz Guitar Lines & Phrases or if you can locate a copy, Garrison Fewell’s 1986 self published Jazz Improvisation book (not the new ones by Berklee Press).

How to Buy:
To buy & check out samples of The Outside Sounds and Substitutions of Modern Saxophonists for Jazz Guitar, go to the Amazon page.
You can also contact the author at kevinkjm24 at gmail dot com to purchase the PDF version.

A review copy of this book was provided by the author. Thanks Kevin!

[Read More Book Reviews]

Book Review: Between the Voicings by Hristo Vitchev

Book Review: Voicing Modes – A Chord Voicing Approach to Hearing and Practicing Modes by Noel Johnston

[Submissions for Review Consideration]

  • Are you an author who wrote a jazz or music book?
  • Have you created a DVD or an online video course or subscription based website?
  • Would you like me to review your book/course?

Please send me a message at azsamad2 at gmail.com with:

For courses: a link to the course/video/product + access info etc.
For books: a link to the book (Dropbox) or PDF attachment (if it’s small) for review consideration.

Depending on whether I dig the book/course, I’ll let you know if I do plan to review it!

I cannot guarantee a review for every submission & if I’m not too into it, I may opt not to review it. I mean, it’s better to get a good review that for me to write a bad review just because it’s not a match for the kind of stuff I dig right? :p

NOTE: All reviews reflect my honest personal opinion so be aware that I will point out both cool Pros and Cons that I see in the work. You dig? 🙂

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Practicing Mick Goodrick’s Almanac of Guitar Voice Leading Volume 1

Recently, I started practicing a few pages of Mick’s awesome book “Almanac of Guitar Voice Leading Volume 1” every day. It’s been an interesting process to discover unfamiliar voicing types and learn new sounds. In the middle of the 10 days, I also started work on Ken Taft’s Developmental Arpeggios book. Here’s a collection of the first 10 days of practice so far.

To check out what I’m currently practicing or exploring, go to:
http://www.facebook.com/azsamad
and
http://www.facebook.com/azsamadmusic

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